Orbital’s Antares/Cygnus Team Wins National Space Society’s Space Pioneer Award for Science and Engineering

The National Space Society takes great pleasure in awarding a 2014 Space Pioneer Award for the Science and Engineering category to Orbital Science Corporation’s Antares/Cygnus Team. The National Space Society will present the Space Pioneer Award to Mr. Frank Mauro, Vice President and CRS Program Director, Mr. Mike Pinkston, the Antares Program Manager, and Mr. Frank Culbertson, Jr, Executive Vice President and General Manager of Orbital’s Advanced Programs Group. The award presentation will take place on Friday, May 16, 2014, at NSS’s annual conference, the 2014 International Space Development Conference (ISDC). The conference will be held at the Sheraton Gateway Hotel in Los Angeles, CA., from May 14-18, 2014.

About Orbital Sciences Antares/Cygnus Team:

The achievements of Orbital’s Antares/Cygnus Team at Orbital Science Corporation included the development, construction, launch and successful operation of the Antares booster and Cygnus spacecraft under NASA’s COTS/CRS program. CRS stands for Commercial Resupply Services. Orbital’s Headquarters are in Dulles, VA, and its Launch vehicle Program Offices are located in Chandler, AZ.

About the Antares/Cygnus project:

Antares/Cygnus
Orbital Sciences’ Antares rocket and Cygnus spacecraft.

As a private company Orbital sucessfully designed, integrated, and built both a midsized Antares liquid-fuel launch vehicle (their first) and a Cygnus orbital tug with a cargo canister. This was done using off-the-shelf technology, modified where necessary, from an international network of suppliers. One demonstration and one commercial flight were accomplished in 2013 with rendezvous and docking with and delivery of materials to the Space Station both times. The spacecraft can deliver up to 2 metric tons of cargo to the Space Station. Essentially flawless performance of the Antares booster and the Cygnus cargo vehicle on all flights so far has demonstrated Orbital’s success in getting the design right the first time. Antares will also become available for cost effectively launching mid-sized payloads comparable to the retiring Delta-II. It is designed to place 5 metric tons into orbit, and all 3 flights have been successful. The Cygnus service and propulsion module can also be regarded as a prototype for a flexible design space tug to move large external cargo placed in orbit to the Space Station.

About the Space Pioneer Award:

Space Pioneer AwardThe Space Pioneer Award consists of a silvery pewter Moon globe cast by the Baker Art Foundry in Placerville, California, from a sculpture originally created by Don Davis, the well-known space and astronomical artist. The globe, as shown at right, which represents multiple space mission destinations and goals, sits freely on a brass support with a wooden base and brass plaque, which are created by Michael Hall’s Studio Foundry of Driftwood, TX. There are several different categories under which the award is presented each year, starting in 1988. The NSS Awards Committee has been chaired by John Strickland since 2007 and its members seek prestigious award candidates on a continual basis.

About the ISDC: The International Space Development Conference (ISDC) is the annual conference of the National Space Society bringing together NSS leaders and members with leading managers, engineers, scientists, educators, and businessmen from civilian, military, commercial, entrepreneurial, and grassroots advocacy space sectors.

SpaceX President Gwynne Shotwell Wins National Space Society’s Space Pioneer Award for Entrepreneurial Business

The National Space Society takes great pleasure in awarding its 2014 Space Pioneer Award for the Entrepreneurial Business category to SpaceX President and Chief Operating Officer Gwynne R. Shotwell. NSS will present the Space Pioneer Award to Mrs. Shotwell on Saturday May 17, at NSS’s annual conference, the 2014 International Space Development Conference (ISDC).  The conference will be held at the Sheraton Gateway Hotel in Los Angeles, CA, and will run from May 14-18, 2014.

About Gwynne Shotwell:

Gwynne ShotwellWith this award we recognize Mrs. Shotwell’s immense service to the space community. We are honoring her specifically for her day to day management of SpaceX business, as an effective spokesperson, and in leading the sales of over $5B in launch services business to a global set of customers. She is also in charge of a wide array of other critical company operations. As the seventh employee of SpaceX in 2002, she has given over 11 years of her life to the fastest growing space company in history, contributing to its excellence in business discipline and restoring the US as a major space launch provider. Her two degrees (BA and MA) in mechanical engineering and applied math from Northwestern University, along with her undergraduate concentration in economics, have served her very well in working with SpaceX engineers and in explaining both the technical and the business details to customers, at conferences, and to the Congress. She previously worked at the Aerospace Corporation and Microcosm, Inc. During her career she has authored dozens of technical papers on spacecraft design, and also participates in STEM scholarship programs.

About SpaceX:

The work currently progressing at SpaceX has a high potential of finally allowing the long awaited economic breakout into space. The core mission of SpaceX is to lower the cost of accessing space by creating a system of reusable rocket boosters and spacecraft, with a policy of continuous improvement. The company was founded in 2002 by Elon Musk and Tom Mueller. It has grown to over 3000 employees and is now the world’s largest producer of rocket engines. The company has a manifest of about 50 launches, has already provided several resupply missions to the Space Station, recovering its Dragon capsule safely each time, and will be testing new hardware in 2014 leading to a reusable rocket first stage within a few years. The company’s long-range goal is to create a fully reusable space transportation system to allow large numbers of people to reach Mars.

About the Space Pioneer Award

Space Pioneer AwardThe Space Pioneer Award consists of a silvery pewter Moon globe cast by the Baker Art Foundry in Placerville, California, from a sculpture originally created by Don Davis, the well-known space and astronomical artist.  The globe, as shown at right, which represents multiple space mission destinations and goals, sits freely on a brass support with a wooden base and brass plaque, which are created by Michael Hall’s Studio Foundry of Driftwood, TX. There are several different categories under which the award is presented each year, starting in 1988.  The NSS Awards Committee has been chaired by John Strickland since 2007 and its members seek prestigious award candidates on a continual basis.

About the ISDC:  The International Space Development Conference (ISDC) is the annual conference of the National Space Society bringing together NSS leaders and members with leading managers, engineers, scientists, educators, and businessmen from civilian, military, commercial, entrepreneurial, and grassroots advocacy space sectors.

New Watershed for Space Solar Power

The Case for Space Solar PowerBook Review: The Case for Space Solar Power, by John C. Mankins

Reviewed by: Paul Werbos, Executive Vice President, National Space Society

If you, like me, are one of those people who really want to do the most you can “to make the dream real,” you need to have a copy of this book on your shelves so that you can read it, reread it, and go back for all the important details. If you could only afford to have one book on your shelves, this should be it.

This book by John Mankins is a major milestone in doing the work required to translate the National Space Society’s general vision into a concrete reality with a viable business case. The author was the leader at NASA of virtually all the useful work on space solar power (SSP) by the US government in the last 25 years, so this book is a unique and authoritative source. Mankins also led the efforts in human and robotic technology in the first round of Bush’s “return to the Moon” program, and this book tells you a lot about what has been going on in those areas as well. In the final section, the book gets deep into concrete business plan options.

Not only does this book provide the blueprint for providing Earth with limitless clean energy, the book also offers a whole new basis for solid, realistic hope that we might succeed after all in the kind of vision which Gerard O’Neill inspired decades ago, where humans settle space in an economically sustainable way, beaming energy to Earth as part of a growing space economy.

Back in the late 1970s, when there was a lot of hope for SSP but the designs were unproven and questionable, many energy experts walked away and never looked back. In the 1990s, Mankins led the NASA Fresh Look work which exposed what was wrong with the old designs, and found new designs that would work but were still too expensive. When John and I worked together in a National Science Foundation study of enabling technologies for SSP in 2002, the most serious life-cycle cost estimates for the best available designs were still about 20 cents per kwh for the electricity. That was still more expensive than the average we pay for electricity generation today (about ten cents), and it required improvements in launch technology which were not then on the horizon.

But now, in this book, Mankins presents a new design concept, SPS-ALPHA (Solar Power Satellite via Arbitrarily Large Phased Array), for which the best guess on cost is only 9 cents per kwh. This year there is also new hope for launch costs, which is a necessary complement to better design and more realistic costs.

The great beauty of SPS-ALPHA is that it relies on a “Lego” kind of approach, building up a huge structure from modules which all weigh less than a ton. This gets rid of the need for heavy lift vehicles, and we can use whatever gets us to space most cheaply.

Some people may be disappointed that Mankins’ plan for SSP does not provide for many humans in space, but that is part of the plan’s strength in reducing cost. The Mankins plan instead shows the way to build up the infrastructure we need in space before we can have a realistic chance to expand human settlement further. If we fulfill that plan, there will be ever more opportunity and need to bring more and more humans along, step by step, perhaps starting out with a kind of swarm city more like a giant expansion of the International Space Station (but with a net positive revenue flow) than like the habitats we will build eventually.

As a matter of honesty, I have to say that the book does not tell us everything we need to know to make the dream a reality. The book tells us a huge amount about competing designs for SSP, some of which might work out better after ALPHA paves the way. But there are other possibilities in the same design space, such as new ideas from the Naval Research Labs about how to handle heat flow issues within the ALPHA approach, and there are additional approaches to reducing launch costs. Nevertheless, Mankins’ book is the game plan for bringing SSP itself to reality. To make a positive difference in the game, we need to have that game plan close at hand, not just on our bookshelves but in all of our strategic thinking for all of the things we can do to help.

The Case for Space Solar Power is available in hard cover and in an inexpensive Kindle edition from Amazon. If you don’t have a Kindle, there are free Kindle reader apps at tinyurl.com/kindlereaderapps that enable you to read it on your computer or mobile device.

New Book: The Case for Space Solar Power

A strong case for harnessing space solar power is presented in this ground-breaking new book. Author John C. Mankins, one of the foremost experts in the field, presents his latest research in The Case for Space Solar Power.

The Case for Space Solar Power

The Case for Space Solar Power recounts the history of the space solar power concept and summarizes the many different ways in which it might be accomplished.

Specifically, the book describes in detail a highly promising concept — SPS-ALPHA (Solar Power Satellite by means of Arbitrarily Large Phased Array) — and presents a business case comprising applications in space and markets on Earth. It is possible to begin now with technologies that are already at hand , while developing the more advanced technologies that will be needed to deliver power economically to markets on Earth.

The Case for Space Solar Power lays out a path forward that is both achievable and affordable. Within a dozen years, the first multi-megawatt solar pilot plant could be in operation.

Given that space solar power can transform our future in space, and provide a new source of virtually limitless and sustainable energy to markets across the world, the book poses the question, “Why wouldn’t we pursue space solar power?”

The book is now available both in hardcopy and in an inexpensive Kindle format at Amazon.com. If you don’t have a Kindle, there are free Kindle reader apps at tinyurl.com/kindlereaderapps that enable you to read it on your computer, tablet, or other mobile device.

Elon Musk Wins National Space Society Robert A. Heinlein Award

The National Space Society takes great pleasure in announcing that its 2014 Robert A. Heinlein Memorial Award has been won by acclaimed space entrepreneur Elon Musk, the Chief Designer and CEO of SpaceX. In the last decade, SpaceX, under the leadership of Elon Musk, has been moving directly toward accomplishing goals that many of us in NSS think are of utmost importance, such as forcing a drastic reduction in launch costs by doing the very hard task which no one else in the world has been willing and able to tackle: working to create a family of commercially successful and reusable rocket boosters and reusable spacecraft.

The National Space Society’s prestigious Robert A. Heinlein Memorial Award will be presented to Elon Musk at the 2014 International Space Development Conference (ISDC).  The conference will be held at the Sheraton Gateway Hotel in Los Angeles, CA. The ISDC will run from May 14-18, 2014.

The imaginations of our visionaries of the last 100 years will not be fulfilled until affordable, large scale and high mass operations can take place in Earth orbit and beyond. SpaceX’s Dragon spacecraft is reusable and SpaceX is making great progress towards a reusable rocket, the key development that would make such operations possible.

About Elon Musk:

Elon MuskElon Musk was born in South Africa in 1971 and emigrated first to Canada and then to the US.  He has two B.A. degrees, one in physics and one in economics, from the University of Pennsylvania.  He became a multimillionaire in his late twenties when he sold his start-up company, Zip2, to a division of Compaq Computers.  He went on to more early successes, launching PayPal via a 2000 merger.  He founded Space Exploration Technologies Corporation (SpaceX) in 2002, the same year that he became an American citizen and also the same year he earned the money to fund the new company from the sale of PayPal.  The SpaceX Falcon 1 was the first privately funded liquid fueled rocket to put a payload into orbit.  The larger Falcon 9 rocket has been flying since June 2010 and SpaceX is also developing a reusable version called Falcon 9R and a much larger rocket, Falcon Heavy.  SpaceX has a 1.6-billion dollar contract with NASA to supply the space station via its recoverable Dragon spacecraft.  They are also a competitor in NASA’s Commercial Crew Program.

Like NSS, Musk views space exploration as important for the preservation and expansion of humankind. Musk likes to say that we should become “multi-planetary” as a hedge against all threats to our survival. He said, “Sooner or later, we must expand life beyond this green and blue ball—or go extinct.” To help make that happen, Musk’s goal is to reduce the cost of human spaceflight by a factor of 100.

About the Robert A. Heinlein Award

The Heinlein award is presented once every two years for lifetime achievement in promoting the goal of a free, spacefaring civilization. The winner is determined by a vote of the NSS membership. The award consists of a miniature signal cannon, on a mahogany base with a black granite inlay and a brass plaque as shown.  The award concept came from Robert Heinlein’s classic book The Moon is a Harsh Mistress.  Previous winners include Sir Arthur C. Clarke and Dr. Carl Sagan. More information about this award is at: http://www.nss.org/awards/heinlein_award.html.

Heinlein Award

About the ISDC: 

The International Space Development Conference (ISDC) is the annual conference of the National Space Society, bringing together NSS leaders and members with leading managers, engineers, scientists, educators, and businessmen from civilian, military, commercial, entrepreneurial, and grassroots advocacy space sectors.

2014 Legislative Blitzes: Washingon DC in February, Home Districts in August

Washington Legislative Blitz February 23-25, 2014

The National Space Society will be participating in the Space Exploration Alliance (SEA) 2014 legislative blitz in Washington DC in February. NSS encourages all members to sign up for and participate in the SEA Blitz as described at www.spaceexplorationalliance.org/blitz/ from Rick Zucker of Explore Mars. Dale Skran, Deputy Chair of the NSS Policy Committee will be coordinating NSS members as needed. Please send him a short email message at dalelskranllc@gmail.com indicating you plan to participate when you sign for the Blitz.

The Space Exploration Alliance includes groups ranging from NSS and Explore Mars to AIAA, the Moon Society, the Mars Society, the Planetary Society, the National Society of Black Engineers, SEDS, and Buzz Aldrin’s ShareSpace Foundation. The major goal of the SEA blitz from an NSS perspective will be to provide as much support for the NASA budget as possible during these difficult budgetary times. Now is the time to stand up for space and be counted. We look forward to seeing you in Washington, DC, February 23-25, 2014.

Home District Legislative Blitz August 2014

If you live too far from Washington to participate in the 2014 SEA Blitz, NSS is currently planning on organizing a “home district” blitz later in the year, probably during August when Congress is in recess and members of Congress are in their home districts. If you are interested in participating in the home district visits please send an email to Dale Skran at dalelskranllc@gmail.com. This email should contain your contact information. By doing so, you are giving permission for a statewide coordinator to contact you for purposes of organizing home district visits.

Additionally, we are seeking at least one volunteer to coordinate visits in each state. If you are interested, please send an email to that effect to Dale Skran at the email address above. We especially encourage multiple volunteers for larger states such as California and Texas. Thanks for your support.

Dale Skran
Deputy Chair, NSS Policy Committee

NSS affiliates with Space Exploration Asia

SEA-nameMission:

“Bring space to life by bringing life to space.” – Howard Bloom

Vision:

Space Exploration Asia exists to catalyze life’s third great leap.

  • Life’s first great leap was the jump from the comfort of the sea to the hostile barrens of the land. That move resulted in over fifty million new ways to make a living—over fifty million new species of plants, animals and living things.
  • Life’s second great leap came when dinosaurs took to the utter emptiness of the skies and became birds. That leap produced so many new ways to make a living that there are now twice as many species of birds as there are of us land-crawling mammals.
  • Life’s third great leap is the eight and a half minute jump beyond the pull of Earth’s gravity, the eight and a half minute climb beyond the skies, the climb to a front stoop that looks out on an entire universe, a cosmos waiting to be turned from desert to greenery. For 3.85 billion years, life has eagerly thrust itself. We have an obligation on behalf of life and its diversity. We are the only species able to take life beyond the atmosphere, beyond the clutch of gravity.

Objective:

Space Exploration Asia’s job is to stimulate and inspire. Our task is to gather the most uplifting and expert dreams of the global space community and to present them to the public. Our goal is to build the kind of infrastructure on which all of humankind’s impossible achievements have been built: the infrastructure of desire and the infrastructure of vision.

Space Exploration Asia aims to engage with governments in Asia and the globe, providing advisory services and linking agencies with the right people, the people with the greatest expertise in space.

We also encourage and advise universities and colleges to develop curriculum and faculties on space exploration and space technology. We help achieve this by providing teachers and lectures with more exposure, networks, tools and resources.

We engage with corporations to introduce and explore the facets of space exploration as a rich, untapped business opportunity

We thank the National Space Society for opening its vast international network to us. Space Exploration Asia exists is to take the National Space Society’s vision to Asia…and to all of humanity.

www.spaceexploration.asia

SEA-sonja2Sonia A. Mahendran, CEO, Space Exploration Asia

Sonia A. Mahendran, Coordinator of the International Advisory Board of the National Space Society, is CEO of Space Exploration Asia in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Mahendran co-founded and was CEO of Asia World Summit, the events company that brought Bill Clinton to Malaysia. She has also been a Director at Malaysia’s leading independent private think tank, the Asian Strategic Leadership Institute, and a groundbreaking executive in the Asian Pacific and Middle Eastern operations at British global summit promotion firm Marcus Evans.

In 2008, Mahendran and National Space Society board member Howard Bloom tested the Asian space waters by initiating a space-industry conference in Bangalore co-sponsored by India’s NASA — the Indian Satellite Research Organisation (ISRO) — and the Confederation of Indian Industries (CII), India’s most powerful trade organization. The event was SpaceBiz 2008.

Sonia’s signature Corporate Governance Summits have featured the likes of Mahathir Mohamad, Prime Minister of Malaysia for 22 years; Raja Nazrin Shah, Crown Prince of Malaysia’s second largest state, Perak; Lim Eng Guan Chief Minister of Malaysia’s economically crucial Penang State; and Michael Hershman, Co-Founder of Transparency International.

Sonia’s goal for the National Space Society International Advisory Board is to recruit cabinet level members from Asia, Africa, and South America, members who can expand the scope of global National Space Society projects like the Kalam-NSS Energy Initiative, the partnership between the NSS and the eleventh president of India, Dr. A.P.J. Kalam, an initiative designed to put space solar power on the priority list of the G8 and G20 nations.

Sonia collaborated with the Mayor of Kuala Lumpur on the Asian Metrocity Summit 2010 which brought Mayors from all around Asia and Europe to discuss sustainability.

SEA-peopleSEA-bubbles

Space Solar Power: Key to a Livable Planet Earth

The National Space Society (NSS) today announces a new space solar power international initiative. NSS endorses this initiative and will work to forge an international organization involving America, India and other nations to develop space solar power. This has the potential of solving humanity’s energy needs and greatly mitigating climate change.

The following is a joint statement of Dr. A. P. J. Abdul Kalam, Former President of the Republic of India and Mr. Mark Hopkins, Executive Committee Chairman, National Space Society.


Space Solar Power: Key to a Livable Planet Earth
Joint Statement of Dr. A. P. J. Abdul Kalam
Former President of the Republic of India
and
Mr. Mark Hopkins
Chairman of the Executive Committee, National Space Society
June 1, 2013

We, Dr. Kalam and Mr. Hopkins, have long shared humanity’s dream of all nations living together in prosperity and peace and moving forwards through global collaboration in space to meet the challenges that now face our Planet Earth. We are conscious that all nations have to strive to make our planet livable again, after centuries of devastation of its environment and ecosystems and rapid depletion of its precious mineral resources, including fossil fuels and fresh water.

Over these last three years many of our colleagues, in NSS and in India, have come together and made progress towards this international collaborative mission by sustained dialogue with mutual respect, understanding, and trust. It is essentially this process that has helped us to decide that the time has arrived for us to together attempt to give a direction and momentum to this movement to realize space solar power and its enabling technologies through international collaboration that can help rebuild our environmentally vulnerable planet.

Today, we begin working together in a well organized and well supported manner to realize such a 21st Century global collaboration; and together help to lay the structural foundation for an international collaboration to develop and deploy space solar power systems. We are aware that coalitions and collaborations work best if there is a shared mission and common goals, and effective leadership. We need to build strong, trusting relationships across nations through a participatory process with the active involvement of member nations and their institutions and organizations. We will work to develop an effective mission governance process and hope to evolve, jointly and together in international teams, clear operating procedures regarding decision-making, communications, and accountability. We shall be working together to develop a shared vision, to build strong relationships within the leadership team, and to rotate leadership roles.

Kalam and Hopkins discuss joint statement at the 2013 International Space Development Conference (ISDC).

Such a shared vision shall include specific mechanisms such as the Global Space Knowledge Platform, the International Virtual Laboratory, and the International Advisory Committee that Dr. Kalam has elaborated through discussion papers with Mr. Hopkins and his Address to the 2013 National Space Society’s International Space Development Conference (ISDC 2013). We hope our international collaborative mission will act as a catalyst for a livable planet which will promote prosperity and peaceful relations within and between nations.

We shall start our team building and mission structuring phase with core members from nations who we know are already networking and who are contributing to the dream of harvesting energy from space, including the US, India, Japan, and UK. We shall also invite, as observers, representatives in relevant domains of public policy, science and technology and management systems from other space faring nations like Russia, China, and other European nations. We shall engage in open and frequent communication with people who share our values and goals in governments and societies which are important to the success of this venture. We will help accomplish this through collaborative practices that are the true hallmark of effective global cooperation for a livable planet Earth. We shall have a clear plan of action to market the idea of a livable planet Earth through space solar power to G8 or G20 nations within a year.

Towards this end, we agree to start working together by jointly identifying the core members and observer members in the joint working mechanisms that Dr. Kalam has proposed. This shall be the direction of what we must accomplish in the coming months. We shall build upon the trusting relationships we have established and consolidated these last three years between NSS, Dr. Kalam, and others in India. We shall now strive to expand this relationship in an organized and well-structured manner towards an international collaborative mission to realize space solar power for all humanity.


For more information concerning the plan, see Dr. Kalam’s June 2, 2013  address to the leaders of the Indian aerospace community and “Global Space Solar Plan Unveiled,” Aviation Week, June 3, 2013.

About Dr. Abdul Kalam: Despite coming from a poor background, which required him to work at an early age to supplement his parents’ income, Dr. Kalam obtained degrees in Physics and Aeronautical Engineering. He was project director of India’s first indigenous satellite launch vehicle. Dr. Kalam was subsequently responsible for the evolution of ISRO’s (India’s equivalent of NASA) launch vehicle program. From 1992 to 1999, he was the Scientific Adviser to Defense Minister of India and Secretary, Department of Defense Research & Development. Dr. Kalam was President of India from 2002 to 2007. He is known for his work with students. His 79th birthday was recognized as “World Student’s Day” by the United Nations. According to a 2010 Readers Digest poll, he is one of the two most trusted men in India. Dr. Kalam has received numerous prestigious awards including the Bharat Ratna, India’s highest civilian honor, and the 2013 Wernher von Braun Memorial award from the National Space Society. He currently serves as the Chancellor of the Indian Institute of Space Technology, the leading institution for producing new engineers and scientists for India’s space program. Read more about Dr. Kalam at his website.

Kalam Address at ISDC: Space Solar Power – Key to a Liveable Planet Earth

Dr. A.P.J. Abdul Kalam, aerospace engineer and former President of India, presented the keynote address at the NSS International Space Development Conference on May 24 in San Diego on the subject Space Solar Power: Key to a Liveable Planet Earth.  The complete address is now available on the NSS website.

Kalam stated: “Considering the magnitude of the looming energy and environmental problems, a strong view has emerged that the situation faced by India warrants consideration of all energy options, including the concept of SSP. ISRO [Indian Space Research Organization] has recently carried out some preliminary concept studies on SSP and examined three SSP configurations. ISRO has also welcomed an International Preliminary Feasibility Study and are aware that this would call for strong and long-term cooperation between institutions in every nation blended into an International R&D programme for SSP.”

Kalam listed the following advantages of SSP:

1. Immensely Scalable. SSP can scale to provide the energy needs of the entire human civilization at well enhanced standards of living. Most other near-term renewable options are strictly limited in scalability.

2. A single kilometre-wide band of geosynchronous Earth orbit experiences enough solar flux in one year to nearly equal the amount of energy contained within all known recoverable conventional oil reserves on Earth today.

3. It is safe and globally available, and can be safely shared with all countries on this planet without proliferation concerns.

4. It is steady & assured, for SSP is a continuous, rather than intermittent, power source. It is not subject to the weather, the seasons, or the day-night cycle.

5. It needs no fundamental breakthroughs in either physics or engineering.

Kalam called for international cooperation in developing space solar power, stating “we shall embark on a path-breaking international mission for space solar power within the ambit of a global vision for space industrialization leading on to a new era of peace, prosperity and abundance for all mankind.”

10-Minute Introduction to Space Solar Power

Creative Visualizations of Space Solar Power. The videos below, totaling 10 minutes, are student productions that have been professionally mentored and peer-reviewed at Ohio University and presented at the National Space Society International Space Development Conference in San Diego in May 2013.

Sol Invictus: The Unconquered Sun – Introduction.

Sol Invictus: The Unconquered Sun – SunSats.

Sol Invictus: The Unconquered Sun – Conclusion.

Electricity is one of the most flexible, cost effective and non-polluting sources of power at the point of use. Energy from Space will be key to achieving and sustaining universal access to this form of power, since all known energy supplies on Earth will be insufficient to keep up with projected world demand for electricity

About 80% of our current energy supply is in the form of fossil fuels. Greater diversification and augmentation of energy sources is needed. To protect our planet, our long-term goal must be to find alternative energy supplies that are clean, renewable, affordable, and available to everyone. Guaranteed access to non-polluting energy is a controlling variable for local and national security, economic and social development and a good quality of life for everyone. Thus, as citizens of Planet Earth, we are fortunate that solar power satellites can now be used to reach up and harvest the abundant energy that is available just outside Earth’s atmosphere.

For more information visit Ohio University’s Online Journal of Space Communication.